Idioms

    get laid, Slang: Vulgar. to have sexual intercourse.
    lay aboard, Nautical. (formerly, of a fighting ship) to come alongside (another fighting ship) in order to board.
    lay about one,
    1. to strike or aim blows in every direction.
    2. to proceed to do; set about.
    lay a course,
    1. Nautical.to sail in the desired direction without tacking.
    2. to proceed according to a plan.
    lay close, Nautical. (of a sailing vessel) to sail close to the wind.
    lay it on, to exaggerate in one's speech or actions, especially to engage in exaggerated flattery or reproof: She was glad to be told what a splendid person she was, but they didn't have to lay it on so much.Also lay it on thick.
    lay oneself out, Informal. to try one's best; make a great effort: They laid themselves out to see that the reception would be a success.
    lay siege to. siege(def 9).

Origin of lay

1
before 900; Middle English layen, leggen, Old English lecgan (causative of licgan to lie2); cognate with Dutch leggen, German legen, Old Norse legja, Gothic lagjan
Can be confusedlay lie2 (see usage note at the current entry)downsize fire lay off rightsize terminatelay off layoff

Synonyms for lay

1. deposit. See put. 22. calm, still, quiet.

Usage note

Lay1 and lie2 are often confused. Lay is most commonly a transitive verb and takes an object. Its forms are regular. If “place” or “put” can be substituted in a sentence, a form of lay is called for: Lay the folders on the desk. The mason is laying brick. She laid the baby in the crib. Lay also has many intransitive senses, among them “to lay eggs” ( The hens have stopped laying ), and it forms many phrasal verbs, such as lay off “to dismiss (from employment)” or “to stop annoying or teasing” and lay over “to make a stop.”
Lie, with the overall senses “to be in a horizontal position, recline” and “to rest, remain, be situated, etc.,” is intransitive and takes no object. Its forms are irregular; its past tense form is identical with the present tense or infinitive form of lay : Lie down, children. Abandoned cars were lying along the road. The dog lay in the shade and watched the kittens play. The folders have lain on the desk since yesterday.
In all but the most careful, formal speech, forms of lay are commonly heard in senses normally associated with lie. In edited written English such uses of lay are rare and are usually considered nonstandard: Lay down, children. The dog laid in the shade. Abandoned cars were laying along the road. The folders have laid on the desk since yesterday.

thick

[thik]

adjective, thick·er, thick·est.

having relatively great extent from one surface or side to the opposite; not thin: a thick slice.
measured, as specified, between opposite surfaces, from top to bottom, or in a direction perpendicular to that of the length and breadth; (of a solid having three general dimensions) measured across its smallest dimension: a board one inch thick.
composed of or containing objects, particles, etc., close together; dense: a thick fog; a thick forest.
filled, covered, or abounding (usually followed by with): tables thick with dust.
husky or hoarse; not distinctly articulated: The patient's speech is still quite thick.
markedly so (as specified): a thick German accent.
deep or profound: thick darkness.
(of a liquid) heavy or viscous: a thick syrup.
Informal. close in friendship; intimate.
mentally slow; stupid; dull.
disagreeably excessive or exaggerated: They thought it a bit thick when he called himself a genius.

adverb, thick·er, thick·est.

in a thick manner.
close together; closely packed: The roses grew thick along the path.
in a manner to produce something thick: Slice the cheese thick.

noun

the thickest, densest, or most crowded part: in the thick of the fight.

Idioms

    lay it on thick, Informal. to praise excessively; flatter: He's laying it on thick because he wants you to do him a favor.
    through thick and thin, under favorable and unfavorable conditions; steadfastly: We have been friends for 20 years, through thick and thin.

Origin of thick

before 900; (adj. and adv.) Middle English thikke, Old English thicce; cognate with Dutch dik, German dick; akin to Old Norse thykkr (noun) Middle English, derivative of the adj.
Related formsthick·ish, adjectivethick·ly, adverbo·ver·thick, adjectiveo·ver·thick·ly, adverbo·ver·thick·ness, nounsu·per·thick, adjectiveun·thick, adjectiveun·thick·ly, adverbun·thick·ness, noun

Synonyms for thick

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for lay it on thick

thick

adjective

of relatively great extent from one surface to the other; fat, broad, or deepa thick slice of bread
  1. (postpositive)of specific fatnessten centimetres thick
  2. (in combination)a six-inch-thick wall
having a relatively dense consistency; not transparentthick soup
abundantly covered or filleda piano thick with dust
impenetrable; densea thick fog
stupid, slow, or insensitivea thick person
throaty or badly articulateda voice thick with emotion
(of accents, etc) pronounced
informal very friendly (esp in the phrase thick as thieves)
a bit thick British unfair or excessive
a thick ear informal a blow on the ear delivered as punishment, in anger, etc

adverb

in order to produce something thickto slice bread thick
profusely; in quick succession (esp in the phrase thick and fast)
lay it on thick informal
  1. to exaggerate a story, statement, etc
  2. to flatter excessively

noun

a thick piece or part
the thick the busiest or most intense part
through thick and thin in good times and bad
Derived Formsthickish, adjectivethickly, adverb

Word Origin for thick

Old English thicce; related to Old Saxon, Old High German thikki, Old Norse thykkr

lay

1

verb lays, laying or laid (leɪd) (mainly tr)

to put in a low or horizontal position; cause to lieto lay a cover on a bed
to place, put, or be in a particular state or positionhe laid his finger on his lips
(intr) not standard to be in a horizontal position; liehe often lays in bed all the morning
(sometimes foll by down) to establish as a basisto lay a foundation for discussion
to place or dispose in the proper positionto lay a carpet
to arrange (a table) for eating a meal
to prepare (a fire) for lighting by arranging fuel in the grate
(also intr) (of birds, esp the domestic hen) to produce (eggs)
to present or put forwardhe laid his case before the magistrate
to impute or attributeall the blame was laid on him
to arrange, devise, or prepareto lay a trap
to place, set, or locatethe scene is laid in London
to apply on or as if on a surfaceto lay a coat of paint
to impose as a penalty or burdento lay a fine
to make (a bet) with (someone)I lay you five to one on Prince
to cause to settleto lay the dust
to allay; suppressto lay a rumour
to bring down forcefullyto lay a whip on someone's back
slang to have sexual intercourse with
slang to bet on (a horse) to lose a race
to press down or make smoothto lay the nap of cloth
to cut (small trunks or branches of shrubs or trees) halfway through and bend them diagonally to form a hedgeto lay a hedge
to arrange and twist together (strands) in order to form (a rope, cable, etc)
military to apply settings of elevation and training to (a weapon) prior to firing
(foll by on) hunting to put (hounds or other dogs) onto a scent
another word for inlay
(intr; often foll by to or out) dialect, or informal to plan, scheme, or devise
(intr) nautical to move or go, esp into a specified position or directionto lay close to the wind
lay aboard nautical (formerly) to move alongside a warship to board it
lay a course
  1. nauticalto sail on a planned course without tacking
  2. to plan an action
lay bare to reveal or explainhe laid bare his plans
lay hands on See hands (def. 12)
lay hold of to seize or grasp
lay oneself open to make oneself vulnerable (to criticism, attack, etc)by making such a statement he laid himself open to accusations of favouritism
lay open to reveal or disclose
lay siege to to besiege (a city, etc)

noun

the manner or position in which something lies or is placed
taboo, slang
  1. an act of sexual intercourse
  2. a sexual partner
a portion of the catch or the profits from a whaling or fishing expedition
the amount or direction of hoist in the strands of a rope

Word Origin for lay

Old English lecgan; related to Gothic lagjan, Old Norse leggja

usage

In careful English, the verb lay is used with an object and lie without one: the soldier laid down his arms; the Queen laid a wreath; the book was lying on the table; he was lying on the floor. In informal English, lay is frequently used for lie: the book was laying on the table. All careful writers and speakers observe the distinction even in informal contexts

lay

2

adjective

of, involving, or belonging to people who are not clergy
nonprofessional or nonspecialist; amateur

Word Origin for lay

C14: from Old French lai, from Late Latin lāicus, ultimately from Greek laos people

lay

3

noun

a ballad or short narrative poem, esp one intended to be sung
a song or melody

Word Origin for lay

C13: from Old French lai, perhaps of Germanic origin

lay

4

verb

the past tense of lie 2
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for lay it on thick

thick

adj.

Old English þicce "not thin, dense," from Proto-Germanic *theku-, *thekwia- (cf. Old Saxon thikki, Old High German dicchi, German dick, Old Norse þykkr, Old Frisian thikke), from PIE *tegu- "thick" (cf. Gaelic tiugh).

Secondary Old English sense of "close together" is preserved in thickset and proverbial phrase thick as thieves (1833). Meaning "stupid" is first recorded 1590s. Phrase thick and thin is in Chaucer (late 14c.); thick-skinned is attested from 1540s; in figurative sense from c.1600. To be in the thick of some action, etc., "to be at the most intense moment" is from 1680s, from a Middle English noun sense.

lay

v.

Old English lecgan "to place on the ground (or other surface)," also "put down (often by striking)," from Proto-Germanic *lagjanan (cf. Old Saxon leggian, Old Norse leggja, Old Frisian ledza, Middle Dutch legghan, Dutch leggen, Old High German lecken, German legen, Gothic lagjan "to lay, put, place"), causative of lie (v.2). As a noun, from 1550s, "act of laying." Meaning "way in which something is laid" (e.g. lay of the land) first recorded 1819.

Meaning "have sex with" first recorded 1934, in U.S. slang, probably from sense of "deposit" (which was in Old English, as in lay an egg, lay a bet, etc.), perhaps reinforced by to lie with, a phrase frequently met in the Bible. The noun meaning "woman available for sexual intercourse" is attested from 1930, but there are suggestions of it in stage puns from as far back as 1767. To lay for (someone) "await a chance at revenge" is from late 15c.; lay low "stay inconspicuous" is from 1839. To lay (someone) low preserves the secondary Old English sense.

lay

adj.

"uneducated; non-clerical," early 14c., from Old French lai "secular, not of the clergy" (Modern French laïque), from Late Latin laicus, from Greek laikos "of the people," from laos "people," of unknown origin. In Middle English, contrasted with learned, a sense revived 1810 for "non-expert."

lay

n.

"short song," mid-13c., from Old French lai "song, lyric," of unknown origin, perhaps from Celtic (cf. Irish laid "song, poem," Gaelic laoidh "poem, verse, play") because the earliest verses so called were Arthurian ballads, but OED finds this "out of the question" and prefers a theory which traces it to a Germanic source, cf. Old High German leich "play, melody, song."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

lay it on thick in Medicine

thick

[thĭk]

adj.

Relatively great in extent from one surface to the opposite, usually in the smallest solid dimension; not thin.
Measuring a specified number of units in this dimension.
Heavy in form, build, or stature; thickset.
Having component parts in a close, crowded state or arrangement; dense.
Having or suggesting a heavy or viscous consistency.
Having a great number; abounding.
Impenetrable by the eyes.
Not easy to hear or understand; indistinctly articulated.
Noticeably affecting sound; conspicuous.
Producing indistinctly articulated sounds.

adv.

In a close, compact state or arrangement; densely.
In a thick manner; deeply or heavily.

n.

The most active or intense part.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with lay it on thick

lay it on thick

Also, lay it on with a trowel. Exaggerate, overstate; also, flatter effusively. For example, Jane laid it on thick when she said this was the greatest book she'd ever read, or Tom thought he'd get the senator to waive the speaker's fee if he just laid it on with a trowel. This idiom alludes to applying a thick coat of paint or plaster. [c. 1600]

lay

In addition to the idioms beginning with lay

  • lay about one
  • lay a finger on
  • lay an egg
  • lay aside
  • lay at rest
  • lay at someone's door
  • lay a wager
  • lay away
  • lay by
  • lay claim to
  • lay down
  • lay down the law
  • lay eyes on
  • lay for
  • lay hands on
  • lay hold of
  • lay in
  • lay into
  • lay it on the line
  • lay it on thick
  • lay low
  • lay odds
  • lay off
  • lay of the land, the
  • lay on
  • lay one's cards on the table
  • lay oneself out
  • lay on the line
  • lay open
  • lay out
  • lay over
  • lay someone low
  • lay to rest
  • lay up
  • lay waste

also see:

  • let it lay

Also see underlaid uplieput.

thick

In addition to the idioms beginning with thick

  • thick and fast
  • thick and thin
  • thick as thieves
  • thick skin

also see:

  • blood is thicker than water
  • lay it on thick
  • plot thickens
  • through thick and thin
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.