liripipe

[lir-ee-pahyp]
noun
  1. a hood with a long, hanging peak, worn originally by medieval academics and later adopted for general wear in the 14th and 15th centuries.
  2. a long strip or tail of fabric hanging from a garment or headdress, especially the peak of this hood or a streamer on a chaperon; tippet.

Origin of liripipe

First recorded in 1540–50, liripipe is from the Medieval Latin word liripipium, of obscure origin
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Examples from the Web for liripipe

Historical Examples of liripipe

  • There was the twist round the head, the cockscomb, the hanging piece of liripipe.

    English Costume

    Dion Clayton Calthrop

  • The simple folk wore a hood of linen, with a liripipe and wide ear-flaps.

    English Costume

    Dion Clayton Calthrop

  • His hood is parti-coloured and jagged at the edge and round his face, and his liripipe is very long.

    English Costume

    Dion Clayton Calthrop

  • Here a liripipe is extravagantly long; here a gold circlet decorates curled locks with matchless taste.

    English Costume

    Dion Clayton Calthrop

  • Lowest in rank are the surpliced choristers wearing hoods, with, in some instances, a liripipe depending from them behind.


British Dictionary definitions for liripipe

liripipe

liripoop (ˈlɪrɪˌpuːp)

noun
  1. the tip of a graduate's hood

Word Origin for liripipe

C14: Medieval Latin liripipium, origin obscure
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012