luce

[ loos ]

noun
  1. a pike, especially when fully grown.

Origin of luce

1
1350–1400; Middle English <Middle French lus pike <Late Latin lūcius

Words Nearby luce

Other definitions for Luce (2 of 2)

Luce
[ loos ]

noun
  1. Clare Boothe, 1903–87, U.S. writer, politician, and diplomat.

  2. Henry Robinson, 1898–1967, U.S. publisher and editor (husband of Clare Boothe Luce).

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use luce in a sentence

  • In the invention of Time, luce and his partner, Briton Hadden, are chalk and cheese when they meet at Hotchkiss and Yale.

    The Magazine King | Harold Evans | May 1, 2010 | THE DAILY BEAST
  • These are certainly strong authorities for saying that the Flower-de-luce is the Lily.

  • Hunc gestant ulnis angeli,Ne lapis officiat pedi;Ne luce timor occupet,Aut nocte pestis incubet.

    The Saint's Tragedy | Charles Kingsley
  • Into the feelings of Captain luce it would be impertinent to pry; but a little may be guessed, perhaps, from what follows.

  • luce is going to have nurse take the babies always down the back stairs, for fear I should hear them as they come out and in.

    A Sheaf of Corn | Mary E. Mann
  • Well, and Vera said, 'Here's luce lying tucked up as jolly as a sandboy, why shouldn't we be jolly too?'

    A Sheaf of Corn | Mary E. Mann

British Dictionary definitions for luce

luce

/ (luːs) /


noun
  1. another name for pike 1

Origin of luce

1
C14: from Old French lus, from Late Latin lūcius pike

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012