lunge

1
[ luhnj ]
/ lʌndʒ /

noun

a sudden forward thrust, as with a sword or knife; stab.
any sudden forward movement; plunge.

verb (used without object), lunged, lung·ing.

to make a lunge or thrust; move with a lunge.

verb (used with object), lunged, lung·ing.

to thrust (something) forward; cause to move with a lunge: lunging his finger accusingly.

Nearby words

  1. lunette,
  2. lung,
  3. lung book,
  4. lung fluke,
  5. lungan,
  6. lungee,
  7. lungeous,
  8. lunger,
  9. lungfish,
  10. lungi

Origin of lunge

1
1725–35; earlier longe for French allonge (noun; construed as a longe), allonger (v.) to lengthen, extend, deliver (blows) < Vulgar Latin *allongāre, for Late Latin ēlongāre to elongate

Can be confusedlong longe lounge lunge

lunge

2
[ luhnj ]
/ lʌndʒ /

noun, verb, lunged, lung·ing.

Origin of lunge

2
variant of longe < French; see longe, lune2

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for lunge


British Dictionary definitions for lunge

lunge

1
/ (lʌndʒ) /

noun

a sudden forward motion
fencing a thrust made by advancing the front foot and straightening the back leg, extending the sword arm forwards

verb

to move or cause to move with a lunge
(intr) fencing to make a lunge
Derived Formslunger, noun

Word Origin for lunge

C18: shortened form of obsolete C17 allonge, from French allonger to stretch out (one's arm), from Late Latin ēlongāre to lengthen. Compare elongate

noun

a rope used in training or exercising a horse

verb

(tr) to exercise or train (a horse) on a lunge

Word Origin for lunge

C17: from Old French longe, shortened from allonge, ultimately from Latin longus long 1; related to lunge 1

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for lunge
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper