malinger

[ muh-ling-ger ]
/ məˈlɪŋ gər /

verb (used without object)

to pretend illness, especially in order to shirk one's duty, avoid work, etc.

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decorum

Origin of malinger

1810–20; < French malingre sickly, ailing, equivalent to mal- mal- + Old French heingre haggard (perhaps < Gmc)

OTHER WORDS FROM malinger

ma·lin·ger·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for malinger

  • "Sheep," who has been disposed to malinger, is the worst of the lot.

    Adventures in Alaska|Samuel Hall Young
  • One, of course, can readily see with what facility an individual of the type under discussion could malinger mental symptoms.

  • It was quick work; but Bowles had a college education—he had been only six hours a cowboy when he learned to malinger on the job.

    Bat Wing Bowles|Dane Coolidge
  • No man ever essayed to malinger or to shirk a duty to which he had been allotted by the doctor.

British Dictionary definitions for malinger

malinger
/ (məˈlɪŋɡə) /

verb

(intr) to pretend or exaggerate illness, esp to avoid work

Derived forms of malinger

malingerer, noun

Word Origin for malinger

C19: from French malingre sickly, perhaps from mal badly + Old French haingre feeble
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for malinger

malinger
[ mə-lĭnggər ]

v.

To feign illness or other incapacity in order to avoid duty or work.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.