manège

or ma·nege

[ ma-nezh, -neyzh ]
/ mæˈnɛʒ, -ˈneɪʒ /
|

noun

the art of training and riding horses.
the action, movements, or paces of a trained horse.
a school for training horses and teaching horsemanship.

Origin of manège

1635–45; < French < Italian maneggio; see manage
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for manege

  • He possessed great personal strength, was expert in all manly exercises, and shone especially at the jousts and the manege.

    Windsor Castle|William Harrison Ainsworth
  • As he was leaving the Manege one of these bullies grossly insulted him.

    Scaramouche|Rafael Sabatini
  • We are like horses in a manege, or oxen or dogs taught to draw the plough, or be harnessed to a carriage.

    Thoughts on Man|William Godwin
  • The broad doors flew open, and the manege was soon filled with knights and ladies on foot and horseback.

British Dictionary definitions for manege

manège

manege

/ (mæˈneɪʒ) /

noun

the art of training horses and ridersCompare dressage
a riding school

Word Origin for manège

C17: via French from Italian maneggio, from maneggiare to manage
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for manege

manege


n.

1640s, "riding school;" 1776, "horsemanship, movements proper to a trained horse," from French manège, from Italian maneggio, from maneggiare "to control (a horse)," (see manage (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper