materialize

[ muh-teer-ee-uh-lahyz ]
/ məˈtɪər i əˌlaɪz /

verb (used without object), ma·te·ri·al·ized, ma·te·ri·al·iz·ing.

to come into perceptible existence; appear; become actual or real; be realized or carried out: Our plans never materialized.
to assume material or bodily form; become corporeal: The ghost materialized before Hamlet.

verb (used with object), ma·te·ri·al·ized, ma·te·ri·al·iz·ing.

to give material form to; realize: to materialize an ambition.
to invest with material attributes: to materialize abstract ideas with metaphors.
to make physically perceptible; cause (a spirit or the like) to appear in bodily form.
to render materialistic.

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Also especially British, ma·te·ri·al·ise .

Origin of materialize

First recorded in 1700–10; material + -ize

OTHER WORDS FROM materialize

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for materialize

British Dictionary definitions for materialize

materialize

materialise

/ (məˈtɪərɪəˌlaɪz) /

verb

(intr) to become fact; actually happenour hopes never materialized
to invest or become invested with a physical shape or form
to cause (a spirit, as of a dead person) to appear in material form or (of a spirit) to appear in such form
(intr) to take shape; become tangibleafter hours of discussion, the project finally began to materialize
physics to form (material particles) from energy, as in pair production

Derived forms of materialize

materialization or materialisation, nounmaterializer or materialiser, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012