maundy

[ mawn-dee ]
/ ˈmɔn di /

noun

the ceremony of washing the feet of the poor, especially commemorating Jesus' washing of His disciples' feet on Maundy Thursday.
Also called maundy money. money distributed as alms in conjunction with the ceremony of maundy or on Maundy Thursday.

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Origin of maundy

1250–1300; Middle English maunde < Old French mande < Latin mandātum command, mandate (from the opening phrase novum mandātum (Vulgate) of Jesus' words to the disciples after He had washed their feet). See mandate
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for maundy money (1 of 2)

Maundy money

noun

specially minted coins distributed by the British sovereign on Maundy Thursday

British Dictionary definitions for maundy money (2 of 2)

maundy
/ (ˈmɔːndɪ) /

noun plural maundies

Christianity the ceremonial washing of the feet of poor persons in commemoration of Jesus' washing of his disciples' feet (John 13:4–34) re-enacted in some churches on Maundy Thursday

Word Origin for maundy

C13: from Old French mandé something commanded, from Latin mandatum commandment, from the words of Christ: Mandātum novum dō vōbīs A new commandment give I unto you
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012