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mercy

[ mur-see ]
/ ˈmɜr si /
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noun, plural mer·cies for 4, 5.
compassionate or kindly forbearance shown toward an offender, an enemy, or other person in one's power; compassion, pity, or benevolence: Have mercy on the poor sinner.
the disposition to be compassionate or forbearing: an adversary wholly without mercy.
the discretionary power of a judge to pardon someone or to mitigate punishment, especially to send to prison rather than invoke the death penalty.
an act of kindness, compassion, or favor: She has performed countless small mercies for her friends and neighbors.
something that gives evidence of divine favor; blessing: It was just a mercy we had our seat belts on when it happened.
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Idioms about mercy

    at the mercy of, entirely in the power of; subject to: They were at the mercy of their captors.Also at one's mercy.

Origin of mercy

1125–75; Middle English merci<Old French, earlier mercit<Latin mercēd- (stem of mercēs) wages (Late Latin, Medieval Latin: heavenly reward), derivative of merx goods

Other definitions for mercy (2 of 2)

Mercy
[ mur-see ]
/ ˈmɜr si /

noun
a female given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use mercy in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for mercy

mercy
/ (ˈmɜːsɪ) /

noun plural -cies
compassionate treatment of or attitude towards an offender, adversary, etc, who is in one's power or care; clemency; pity
the power to show mercyto throw oneself on someone's mercy
a relieving or welcome occurrence or state of affairshis death was a mercy after weeks of pain
at the mercy of in the power of

Word Origin for mercy

C12: from Old French, from Latin mercēs wages, recompense, price, from merx goods
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with mercy

mercy

see at the mercy of.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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