minstrel

[ min-struh l ]
/ ˈmɪn strəl /

noun

a medieval poet and musician who sang or recited while accompanying himself on a stringed instrument, either as a member of a noble household or as an itinerant troubadour.
a musician, singer, or poet.
one of a troupe of comedians, usually white men in blackface, presenting songs, jokes, etc., and portraying negative racial stereotypes.

QUIZZES

Discover The Influence Of Portuguese On English Via This Quiz!
We’ve gathered some interesting words donated to English from Portuguese … as well as some that just don’t translate at all. Do you know what they mean?
Question 1 of 11
Which of the following animal names traces its immediate origin to Portuguese?

Origin of minstrel

1175–1225; Middle English ministrel < Old French < Late Latin ministeriālis servant (noun use of adj.); see ministerial
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for minstrel

British Dictionary definitions for minstrel

minstrel
/ (ˈmɪnstrəl) /

noun

a medieval wandering musician who performed songs or recited poetry with instrumental accompaniment
a performer in a minstrel show
archaic, or poetic any poet, musician, or singer

Word Origin for minstrel

C13: from Old French menestral, from Late Latin ministeriālis an official, from Latin minister
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012