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molybdenum

[ muh-lib-duh-nuhm ]
/ məˈlɪb də nəm /
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noun Chemistry.
a silver-white metallic element, used as an alloy with iron in making hard, high-speed cutting tools. Symbol: Mo; atomic weight: 95.94; atomic number: 42; specific gravity: 10.2.
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Origin of molybdenum

First recorded in 1790–1800; from New Latin molybdēnum, alteration of earlier molybdēna “lead ore,” from Latin molybdaena, from Greek molýbdaina “galena,” equivalent to mólybd(os) “lead” + -aina a suffix indicating relationship or origin
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use molybdenum in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for molybdenum

molybdenum
/ (mɒˈlɪbdɪnəm) /

noun
a very hard ductile silvery-white metallic element occurring principally in molybdenite: used mainly in alloys, esp to harden and strengthen steels. Symbol: Mo; atomic no: 42; atomic wt: 95.94; valency: 2–6; relative density: 10.22; melting pt: 2623°C; boiling pt: 4639°C

Word Origin for molybdenum

C19: from New Latin, from Latin molybdaena galena, from Greek molubdaina, from molubdos lead
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for molybdenum

molybdenum
[ mə-lĭbdə-nəm ]

Mo
A hard, silvery-white metallic element that resists corrosion and retains its strength at high temperatures. It is used to harden and toughen steel and to make high-temperature wiring. Molybdenum is an essential trace element in plant metabolism. Atomic number 42; atomic weight 95.96; melting point 2,623°C; boiling point 4,639°C; specific gravity 10.22 (at 20°C); valence 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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