monologue

or mon·o·log

[ mon-uh-lawg, -log ]
/ ˈmɒn əˌlɔg, -ˌlɒg /

noun

a form of dramatic entertainment, comedic solo, or the like by a single speaker: a comedian's monologue.
a prolonged talk or discourse by a single speaker, especially one dominating or monopolizing a conversation.
any composition, as a poem, in which a single person speaks alone.
a part of a drama in which a single actor speaks alone; soliloquy.

Origin of monologue

1615–25; < French, on the model of dialogue dialogue; compare Greek monólogos speaking alone

Related forms

mon·o·log·ic [mon-uh-loj-ik] /ˌmɒn əˈlɒdʒ ɪk/, mon·o·log·i·cal, adjectivemon·o·log·ist [mon-uh-law-gist, -log-ist, muh-nol-uh-jist] /ˈmɒn əˌlɔ gɪst, -ˌlɒg ɪst, məˈnɒl ə dʒɪst/, mon·o·logu·ist [mon-uh-law-gist, -log-ist] /ˈmɒn əˌlɔ gɪst, -ˌlɒg ɪst/, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for monologic

monologue

/ (ˈmɒnəˌlɒɡ) /

noun

a long speech made by one actor in a play, film, etc, esp when alone
a dramatic piece for a single performer
any long speech by one person, esp when interfering with conversation

Derived Forms

monologic (ˌmɒnəˈlɒdʒɪk) or monological, adjectivemonologist (ˈmɒnəˌlɒɡɪst, məˈnɒləɡɪst), nounmonology (mɒˈnɒlədʒɪ), noun

Word Origin for monologue

C17: via French from Greek monologos speaking alone

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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012