Attic

[ at-ik ]
/ ˈæt ɪk /

adjective

of, relating to, or characteristic of Greece or of Athens.
(often lowercase) displaying simple elegance, incisive intelligence, and delicate wit.

noun

the dialect of ancient Attica that became the standard language of Classical Greek literature in the 5th and 4th centuries b.c.

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Origin of Attic

1555–65; < Latin Atticus < Greek Attikós

OTHER WORDS FROM Attic

non-At·tic, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for more-attic (1 of 2)

attic
/ (ˈætɪk) /

noun

a space or room within the roof of a house
architect a storey or low wall above the cornice of a classical façade

Word Origin for attic

C18: special use of Attic from the use of Attic-style pilasters to adorn the façade of the top storey

British Dictionary definitions for more-attic (2 of 2)

Attic
/ (ˈætɪk) /

adjective

of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
(often not capital) classically elegant, simple, or purean Attic style

noun

the dialect of Ancient Greek spoken and written in Athens: the chief literary dialect of classical GreekSee also Aeolic, Arcadic, Doric, Ionic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for more-attic

attic
[ ătĭk ]

n.

The upper portion of the tympanic cavity above the tympanic membrane that contains the head of the malleus and the body of the incus.epitympanum
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.