muckluck

[muhk-luhk]

mukluk

or muc·luc, muck·luck

[muhk-luhk]
noun
  1. a soft boot worn by Eskimos, often lined with fur and usually made of sealskin or reindeer skin.
  2. a similar boot with a soft sole, usually worn for lounging.

Origin of mukluk

1865–70, Americanism; < Yupik maklak bearded seal, incorrectly taken to mean “sealskin,” then transferred to boots made of sealskin
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for muckluck

Historical Examples of muckluck

  • He reflected that he had never seen one that didn't, except Muckluck.

    The Magnetic North

    Elizabeth Robins (C. E. Raimond)

  • She ain't my Muckluck, and I don't believe she's a minx, not a little bit.

    The Magnetic North

    Elizabeth Robins (C. E. Raimond)

  • The Boy pulled off a muckluck and threw it half across the room.

    The Magnetic North

    Elizabeth Robins (C. E. Raimond)

  • "Oh no," said Muckluck soothingly, but her face belied her words.

    The Magnetic North

    Elizabeth Robins (C. E. Raimond)

  • Muckluck also turned to him now and then, and by-and-by she said: "I think he go."

    The Magnetic North

    Elizabeth Robins (C. E. Raimond)


British Dictionary definitions for muckluck

mukluk

noun
  1. a soft boot, usually of sealskin, worn by the Inuit

Word Origin for mukluk

from Inuktitut muklok large seal
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for muckluck
n.

also mukluk, 1868, "sealskin, sealskin boots" from Eskimo maklak "large seal, sealskin." Meaning "canvas boots that resemble Eskimo ones" is from 1962.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper