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muff

[ muhf ]
/ mʌf /
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noun
verb (used with object)
Informal. to bungle; handle clumsily: He muffed a good opportunity.
Sports. to fail to hold onto (a ball that may reasonably be expected to be caught successfully); fumble.
verb (used without object)
Informal. to bungle; perform clumsily.
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Question 1 of 8
Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?
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Origin of muff

1590–1600; <Dutch mof, earlier moffel, muffel mitten, muff <Old North French moufle<early Medieval Latin muffula, perhaps <Frankish

OTHER WORDS FROM muff

muffy, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use muff in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for muff (1 of 2)

muff1
/ (mʌf) /

noun
an open-ended cylinder of fur or cloth into which the hands are placed for warmth
the tuft on either side of the head of certain fowls

Word Origin for muff

C16: probably from Dutch mof, ultimately from French mouffle muffle 1

British Dictionary definitions for muff (2 of 2)

muff2
/ (mʌf) /

verb
to perform (an action) awkwardly
(tr) to bungle (a shot, catch, etc) in a game
noun
any unskilful play in a game, esp a dropped catch
any clumsy or bungled action
a bungler

Word Origin for muff

C19: of uncertain origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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