mind

[ mahynd ]
/ maɪnd /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

QUIZZES

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Let the aeolian gusts transport you back to these popular Words of the Day from the month of May. How many do you remember?
Question 1 of 10
Which of the following words means “to travel or journey, especially to walk on foot”?

Idioms for mind

Origin of mind

before 900; (noun) Middle English mynd(e), aphetic variant (see y-) of imynd, Old English gemynd memory, remembrance, mind; cognate with Gothic gamunds; akin to Latin mēns mind, Greek manía madness; (v.) Middle English minden, derivative of the noun

SYNONYMS FOR mind

1 reason. Mind, intellect, intelligence refer to mental equipment or qualities. Mind is that part of a human being that thinks, feels, and wills, as contrasted with body: His mind was capable of grasping the significance of the problem. Intellect is reasoning power as distinguished from feeling; it is often used in a general sense to characterize high mental ability: to appeal to the intellect, rather than the emotions. Intelligence is ability to learn and to understand; it is also mental alertness or quickness of understanding: A dog has more intelligence than many other animals.
6 Mind, brain, brains may refer to mental capacity. Mind is the philosophical and general term for the center of mental activity, and is therefore used of intellectual powers: a brilliant mind. Brain is properly the physiological term for the organic structure that makes mental activity possible ( The brain is the center of the nervous system. ), but it is often applied, like mind, to intellectual capacity: a fertile brain. Brains is the anatomical word ( the brains of an animal used for food ), but, in popular usage, it is applied to intelligence (particularly of a shrewd, practical nature): To run a business takes brains.
10 bent, leaning, proclivity, penchant; wish, liking.
11 intent.
21 mark.

OTHER WORDS FROM mind

sub·mind, nounun·mind·ing, adjective

Definition for never mind (2 of 2)

never
[ nev-er ]
/ ˈnɛv ər /

adverb

not ever; at no time: Such an idea never occurred to me.
not at all; absolutely not: never mind; This will never do.
to no extent or degree: He was never the wiser for his experience.

Origin of never

before 900; Middle English; Old English nǣfre, equivalent to ne not + ǣfre ever
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for never mind (1 of 2)

mind
/ (maɪnd) /

noun

verb

See also mind out

Word Origin for mind

Old English gemynd mind; related to Old High German gimunt memory

British Dictionary definitions for never mind (2 of 2)

never
/ (ˈnɛvə) /

adverb, sentence substitute

at no time; not ever
certainly not; by no means; in no case

interjection

Also: well I never! surely not!

Word Origin for never

Old English nǣfre, from ne not + æfre ever

usage for never

In informal speech and writing, never can be used instead of not with the simple past tenses of certain verbs for emphasis (I never said that; I never realized how clever he was), but this usage should be avoided in serious writing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for never mind

mind
[ mīnd ]

n.

The human consciousness that originates in the brain and is manifested especially in thought, perception, emotion, will, memory, and imagination.
The collective conscious and unconscious processes in a sentient organism that direct and influence mental and physical behavior.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with never mind (1 of 3)

never mind

1

Don't worry about something, don't trouble yourself, it doesn't matter. For example, Never mind what I said, it wasn't important, or Never mind, you can always take the driver's test again. This expression employs mind in the sense of “care about something,” a usage dating from the late 1700s.

2

Also, never you mind. Don't concern yourself with that, it's none of your business, as in Never you mind where I plan to buy the new TV. [Early 1800s]

Idioms and Phrases with never mind (2 of 3)

mind

Idioms and Phrases with never mind (3 of 3)

never

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.