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collusion

[ kuh-loo-zhuhn ]
/ kəˈlu ʒən /
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noun

a secret agreement, especially for fraudulent or treacherous purposes; conspiracy: Some of his employees were acting in collusion to rob him.
Law. a secret understanding between two or more persons to gain something illegally, to defraud another of his or her rights, or to appear as adversaries though in agreement: collusion of husband and wife to obtain a divorce.

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Origin of collusion

1350–1400; Middle English (<Middle French ) <Latin collūsiōn- (stem of collūsiō), equivalent to collūs(us) (past participle of collūdere to collude) + -iōn--ion
non·col·lu·sion, nounpre·col·lu·sion, noun
collision, collusion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for collusion

collusion
/ (kəˈluːʒən) /

noun

secret agreement for a fraudulent purpose; connivance; conspiracy
a secret agreement between opponents at law in order to obtain a judicial decision for some wrongful or improper purpose
collusive, adjective
C14: from Latin collūsiō, from collūdere to collude
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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