commitment

[kuh-mit-muh nt]

noun


Also committal (for defs 1, 3–11).

Origin of commitment

First recorded in 1605–15; commit + -ment
Related formsnon·com·mit·ment, nounpre·com·mit·ment, adjectiveself-com·mit·ment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for non-commitment

commitment

noun

the act of committing or pledging
the state of being committed or pledged
an obligation, promise, etc that restricts one's freedom of action
the referral of a bill to a committee or legislature
Also called (esp formerly): mittimus law a written order of a court directing that a person be imprisoned
the official consignment of a person to a mental hospital or prison
commission or perpetration, esp of a crime
a future financial obligation or contingent liability
Also called (esp for senses 5, 6): committal (kəˈmɪtəl)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for non-commitment

commitment

n.

1610s, "action of officially consigning to the custody of the state," from commit + -ment. (Anglo-French had commettement.) Meaning "the committing of oneself, pledge, promise" is attested from 1793; hence, "an obligation, an engagement" (1864).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper