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requirement

[ri-kwahyuh r-muh nt]
noun
  1. that which is required; a thing demanded or obligatory: One of the requirements of the job is accuracy.
  2. an act or instance of requiring.
  3. a need or necessity: to meet the requirements of daily life.
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Origin of requirement

First recorded in 1520–30; require + -ment
Related formsnon·re·quire·ment, nounpre·re·quire·ment, nounsu·per·re·quire·ment, noun

Synonyms for requirement

1. Requirement, requisite refer to that which is necessary. A requirement is some quality or performance demanded of a person in accordance with certain fixed regulations: requirements for admission to college. A requisite is not imposed from outside; it is a factor which is judged necessary according to the nature of things, or to the circumstances of the case: Efficiency is a requisite for success in business. Requisite may also refer to a concrete object judged necessary: the requisites for perfect grooming. 2. order, command, injunction, directive, demand, claim.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

British Dictionary definitions for non-requirement

requirement

noun
  1. something demanded or imposed as an obligationLatin is no longer a requirement for entry to university
  2. a thing desired or needed
  3. the act or an instance of requiring
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for non-requirement

requirement

n.

1520s, "request, requisition," from require + -ment. Meaning "things required, a need" is from 1660s. Meaning "that which must be accomplished, necessary condition" is from 1841. Related: Requirements.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with non-requirement

requirement

see meet the requirements.

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The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.