mobile

[ moh-buh l, -beel or, esp. British, -bahyl ]
/ ˈmoʊ bəl, -bil or, esp. British, -baɪl /

adjective

noun

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Origin of mobile

1480–90; < Latin, neuter of mōbilis movable, equivalent to mō- (variant stem of movēre to move) + -bilis -ble

OTHER WORDS FROM mobile

non·mo·bile, adjectivesem·i·mo·bile, adjectiveun·mo·bile, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for nonmobile (1 of 2)

Mobile
/ (ˈməʊbiːl, məʊˈbiːl) /

noun

a port in SW Alabama, on Mobile Bay (an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico): the state's only port and its first permanent settlement, made by French colonists in 1711. Pop: 193 464 (2003 est)

British Dictionary definitions for nonmobile (2 of 2)

mobile
/ (ˈməʊbaɪl) /

adjective

noun

  1. a sculpture suspended in midair with delicately balanced parts that are set in motion by air currents
  2. (as modifier)mobile sculpture Compare stabile
short for mobile phone

Word Origin for mobile

C15: via Old French from Latin mōbilis, from movēre to move
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for nonmobile

mobile

A sculpture made up of suspended shapes that move.

notes for mobile

Alexander Calder, a twentieth-century American sculptor, is known for his mobiles.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.