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notional

[ noh-shuh-nl ]
/ ˈnoʊ ʃə nl /
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adjective

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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

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Origin of notional

First recorded in 1590–1600; notion + -al1

OTHER WORDS FROM notional

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for notional

  • Notionally, the speech was merely to announce how many U.S. troops would be withdrawn from Afghanistan over the next 18 months.

  • Had it undertaken to convey, or ought it to be expected to impart anything defined, anything notionally recognizable?

    A Dish Of Orts|George MacDonald
  • And though God be loved as one that is notionally conceived to be best, and most to be loved, yet he is not loved best or most.

British Dictionary definitions for notional

notional
/ (ˈnəʊʃənəl) /

adjective

relating to, expressing, or consisting of notions or ideas
not evident in reality; hypothetical or imaginarya notional tax credit
characteristic of a notion or concept, esp in being speculative or imaginary; abstract
grammar
  1. (of a word) having lexical meaning
  2. another word for semantic

Derived forms of notional

notionally, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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