wagon

[ wag-uhn ]
/ ˈwæg ən /

noun

verb (used with object)

to transport or convey by wagon.

verb (used without object)

to proceed or haul goods by wagon: It was strenuous to wagon up the hill.Also especially British, waggon.

Idioms for wagon

Origin of wagon

1505–15; < Dutch wagen; cognate with Old English wægn wain

OTHER WORDS FROM wagon

wag·on·less, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for on the wagon (1 of 2)

Wagon

Waggon

/ (ˈwæɡən) /

noun

the Wagon another name for the Plough

British Dictionary definitions for on the wagon (2 of 2)

wagon

waggon

/ (ˈwæɡən) /

noun

verb

(tr) to transport by wagon

Derived forms of wagon

wagonless or waggonless, adjective

Word Origin for wagon

C16: from Dutch wagen wain
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with on the wagon (1 of 2)

on the wagon

Abstaining from drinking alcoholic beverages, as in Don't offer her wine; she's on the wagon. This expression is a shortening of on the water wagon, referring to the horse-drawn water car once used to spray dirt roads to keep down the dust. Its present meaning dates from about 1900. The antonym off the wagon, used for a resumption of drinking, dates from the same period. B.J. Taylor used it in Extra Dry (1906): “It is better to have been on and off the wagon than never to have been on at all.”

Idioms and Phrases with on the wagon (2 of 2)

wagon

see fix someone's wagon; hitch one's wagon; on the bandwagon; on the wagon.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.