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opiate

[ noun, adjective oh-pee-it, -eyt; verb oh-pee-eyt ]
/ noun, adjective 藞o蕣 pi 瑟t, -藢e瑟t; verb 藞o蕣 pi藢e瑟t /
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See synonyms for: opiate / opiated / opiating on Thesaurus.com

noun
adjective
verb (used with object), o路pi路at路ed, o路pi路at路ing.
to subject to an opiate; stupefy: The violent patients were routinely opiated.
to dull or deaden: This dreadful music is opiating my spirit.
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Origin of opiate

First recorded in 1525鈥35; from Middle French, from Medieval Latin opi膩tus 鈥渂ringing sleep,鈥 equivalent to Latin opi(um) 鈥減oppy juice鈥 + adjective suffix -膩tus; see origin at opium, -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM opiate

un路o路pi路at路ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 漏 Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use opiate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for opiate

opiate

noun (藞蓹蕣p瑟瑟t)
adjective (藞蓹蕣p瑟瑟t)
containing or consisting of opium
inducing relaxation; soporific
verb (藞蓹蕣p瑟藢e瑟t) (tr) rare
to treat with an opiate
to dull or deaden

Word Origin for opiate

C16: from Medieval Latin opi膩tus; from Latin opium poppy juice, opium
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition 漏 William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 漏 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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