oracle

[awr-uh-kuh l, or-]

noun


Origin of oracle

1350–1400; Middle English < Old French < Latin ōrāculum, equivalent to ōrā(re) to plead (see oration) + -culum -cle2
Can be confusedauricle oracle
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


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British Dictionary definitions for oracle

oracle

noun

a prophecy, often obscure or allegorical, revealed through the medium of a priest or priestess at the shrine of a god
a shrine at which an oracular god is consulted
an agency through which a prophecy is transmitted
any person or thing believed to indicate future action with infallible authority
a statement believed to be infallible and authoritative
Bible
  1. a message from God
  2. the holy of holies in the Israelite temple
See also oracles

Word Origin for oracle

C14: via Old French from Latin ōrāculum, from ōrāre to request
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for oracle
n.

late 14c., "a message from a god, expressed by divine inspiration," from Old French oracle "temple, house of prayer; oracle" (12c.) and directly from Latin oraculum "divine announcement, oracle; place where oracles are given," from orare "pray, plead" (see orator), with material instrumental suffix -culo-. In antiquity, "the agency or medium of a god," also "the place where such divine utterances were given." This sense is attested in English from c.1400.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper