ordinance

[ awr-dn-uhns ]
/ ˈɔr dn əns /

noun

an authoritative rule or law; a decree or command.
a public injunction or regulation: a city ordinance against excessive horn blowing.
something believed to have been ordained, as by a deity or destiny.
Ecclesiastical.
  1. an established rite or ceremony.
  2. a sacrament.
  3. the communion.

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Origin of ordinance

1275–1325; Middle English ordinaunce (< Old French ordenance) < Medieval Latin ordinantia, derivative of Latin ordinant- (stem of ordināns), present participle of ordināre to arrange. See ordination, -ance

OTHER WORDS FROM ordinance

pre·or·di·nance, noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH ordinance

ordinance ordnance ordonnance
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for ordinance

British Dictionary definitions for ordinance

ordinance
/ (ˈɔːdɪnəns) /

noun

an authoritative regulation, decree, law, or practice

Word Origin for ordinance

C14: from Old French ordenance, from Latin ordināre to set in order
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012