ordinary

[ awr-dn-er-ee ]
/ ˈɔr dnˌɛr i /
|||

adjective

noun, plural or·di·nar·ies.

Idioms

    in ordinary, in regular service: a physician in ordinary to the king.
    out of the ordinary,
    1. exceptional; unusual: Having triplets is certainly out of the ordinary.
    2. exceptionally good; unusually good: The food at this restaurant is truly out of the ordinary.

Origin of ordinary

1250–1300; Middle English ordinarie (noun and adj.) < Latin ordinārius regular, of the usual order, equivalent to ordin- (see order) + -ārius -ary
Related formsor·di·nar·i·ness, nounqua·si-or·di·nar·y, adjectivesu·per·or·di·nar·y, adjectiveun·or·di·nar·y, adjective

Synonym study

3. See common.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for ordinariness

  • There is an ordinariness, an indistinctness, a generalization, not even to be found in a flock of sheep.

  • He tried to take Tump's appearance casually; he tried to maintain an air of ordinariness.

    Birthright|T.S. Stribling
  • And withal, the ordinariness and the midland gumption of the scene were shot through with the bright exotic rays of romance!

    Hilda Lessways|Arnold Bennett
  • Mr. Hazlewood had carried with him a wonderful assurance of ordinariness.

    Guy and Pauline|Compton Mackenzie

British Dictionary definitions for ordinariness

ordinary

/ (ˈɔːdənrɪ) /

adjective

noun plural -naries

Word Origin for ordinary

C16: (adj) and C13: (some n senses): ultimately from Latin ordinārius orderly, from ordō order
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ordinariness

ordinary


adj.

early 15c., "belonging to the usual order or course," from Old French ordinarie "ordinary, usual" and directly from Latin ordinarius "customary, regular, usual, orderly," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "order" (see order (n.)). Its various noun usages, dating to late 14c. and common until 19c., now largely extinct except in out of the ordinary (1893). In British education, Ordinary level (abbrev. O level), "lowest of the three levels of General Certificate of Education," is attested from 1947. Related: Ordinarily.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with ordinariness

ordinary


see out of the ordinary.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.