Idioms for out

Origin of out

before 900; (adv.) Middle English; Old English ūt; cognate with Dutch uit, German aus, Old Norse, Gothic ūt; akin to Sanskrit ud-; (adj., interjection, and preposition) Middle English, from the adv.; (v.) Middle English outen, Old English ūtian to put out, cognate with Old Frisian ūtia
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for out and away (1 of 2)

out and away

adverb

by far

British Dictionary definitions for out and away (2 of 2)

Word Origin for out

Old English ūt; related to Old Saxon, Old Norse ūt, Old High German ūz, German aus

usage for out

The use of out as a preposition, though common in American English, is regarded as incorrect in British English: he climbed out of (not out) a window; he went out through the door
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with out and away (1 of 2)

out and away

By far, surpassing all others, as in He's out and away the best pitcher in the league. [First half of 1800s]

Idioms and Phrases with out and away (2 of 2)

out

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.