parish

[ par-ish ]
/ ˈpær ɪʃ /

noun

an ecclesiastical district having its own church and member of the clergy.
a local church with its field of activity.
(in Louisiana) a county.
the people of an ecclesiastical or civil parish.
Curling. house (def. 20).

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Idioms for parish

    on the parish, British.
    1. receiving charity from local authorities.
    2. Informal. meagerly or inadequately supplied.

Origin of parish

1250–1300; Middle English, variant of parosshe<Middle French paroisse<Late Latin parochia, alteration of paroecia<Late Greek paroikía, derivative of Greek pároikos neighbor, (in Christian usage) sojourner (see paroicous); see -ia

OTHER WORDS FROM parish

in·ter·par·ish, adjectivetrans·par·ish, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for parish

British Dictionary definitions for parish

parish
/ (ˈpærɪʃ) /

noun

a subdivision of a diocese, having its own church and a clergymanRelated adjective: parochial
the churchgoers of such a subdivision
(in England and, formerly, Wales) the smallest unit of local government in rural areas
(in Louisiana) a unit of local government corresponding to a county in other states of the US
the people living in a parish
on the parish history receiving parochial relief

Word Origin for parish

C13: from Old French paroisse, from Church Latin parochia, from Late Greek paroikia, from paroikos Christian, sojourner, from Greek: neighbour, from para- 1 (beside) + oikos house
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012