peaked

1
[ peekt, pee-kid ]
/ pikt, ˈpi kɪd /

adjective

having a peak: a peaked cap.

Origin of peaked

1
First recorded in 1400–50, peaked is from the late Middle English word pekyd. See peak1, -ed3

Definition for peaked (2 of 4)

peaked2
[ pee-kid ]
/ ˈpi kɪd /

adjective

pale and drawn in appearance so as to suggest illness or stress; wan and sickly.

Origin of peaked

2

OTHER WORDS FROM peaked

peak·ed·ly, adverbpeak·ed·ness, noun

Definition for peaked (3 of 4)

Origin of peak

1
1520–30; perhaps < Middle Low German pēk pick, pike

OTHER WORDS FROM peak

peak·less, adjectivepeak·like, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH peak

peak peek pique piqué

Definition for peaked (4 of 4)

peak2
[ peek ]
/ pik /

verb (used without object)

to become weak, thin, and sickly.

Origin of peak

2
First recorded in 1500–10; origin uncertain

OTHER WORDS FROM peak

peak·ish, adjectivepeak·ish·ly, adverbpeak·ish·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for peaked

British Dictionary definitions for peaked (1 of 2)

peaked
/ (piːkt) /

adjective

having a peak; pointed

British Dictionary definitions for peaked (2 of 2)

peak
/ (piːk) /

noun

verb

(tr) nautical to set (a gaff) or tilt (oars) vertically
to form or reach or cause to form or reach a peak or maximum

adjective

of or relating to a period of highest use or demand, as for watching television, commuting, etcpeak viewing hours; peak time

Derived forms of peak

peaky or peakish, adjective

Word Origin for peak

C16: perhaps from pike ², influenced by beak 1; compare Spanish pico, French pic, Middle Low German pēk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012