pelt

1
[pelt]

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

noun


Origin of pelt

1
First recorded in 1490–1500; origin uncertain
Related formsun·pelt·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for pelted

Contemporary Examples of pelted

Historical Examples of pelted

  • One of our chaps, taking in a load of wounded, was chased and pelted the other day.

    Ballads of a Bohemian

    Robert W. Service

  • The Poets who embrace and admire the people are often pelted with stones and crucified.

    Alarms and Discursions

    G. K. Chesterton

  • Adelaide and Courvoisier, it seemed, might almost be pelted with the same stones.

    The First Violin

    Jessie Fothergill

  • Two of the persons who went to fetch them were well thrashed and pelted with stones.

    The Phantom World

    Augustin Calmet

  • Then we pelted her with sunshine, and caressed her with shade, and then she was happiest of all.



British Dictionary definitions for pelted

pelt

1

verb

(tr) to throw (missiles) at (a person)
(tr) to hurl (insults) at (a person)
(intr; foll by along, over, etc) to move rapidly; hurry
(intr often foll by down) to rain heavily

noun

a blow
speed (esp in the phrase at full pelt)
Derived Formspelter, noun

Word Origin for pelt

C15: of uncertain origin, perhaps from pellet

pelt

2

noun

the skin of a fur-bearing animal, such as a mink, esp when it has been removed from the carcass
the hide of an animal, stripped of hair and ready for tanning

Word Origin for pelt

C15: perhaps back formation from peltry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pelted

pelt

v.

"to strike" (with something), c.1500, of unknown origin; perhaps from early 13c. pelten "to strike," variant of pilten "to thrust, strike," from an unrecorded Old English *pyltan, from Medieval Latin *pultiare, from Latin pultare "to beat, knock, strike." Or from Old French peloter "to strike with a ball," from pelote "ball" (see pellet (n.)) [Klein]. Watkins says the source is Latin pellere "to push, drive, strike." Related: Pelted; pelting.

pelt

n.

"skin of a fur-bearing animal," early 15c., of uncertain origin, perhaps a contraction of pelet (late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), from Old French pelete "fine skin, membrane," diminutive of pel "skin," from Latin pellis "skin, hide" (see film (n.)). Or perhaps the source of the English word is Anglo-French pelterie, Old French peletrie "fur skins," from Old French peletier "furrier," from pel.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper