peristylium

[per-uh-stahy-lee-uh m, -stil-ee-]
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noun, plural per·i·sty·li·a [per-uh-stahy-lee-uh, -stil-ee-uh] /ˌpɛr əˈstaɪ li ə, -ˈstɪl i ə/.

a peristyle.

Origin of peristylium

1665–75; < Latin peristȳlium < Greek peristȳ́lion, diminutive of perístȳlon peristyle
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for peristylium

Historical Examples of peristylium

  • The Greek bowed his farewells, then followed the boy back through the court of the peristylium.

    A Friend of Caesar

    William Stearns Davis

  • And the door, beaten from its fastenings by a mighty stroke, tumbled inward on to the mosaic pavement of the peristylium.

    A Friend of Caesar

    William Stearns Davis

  • Mamercus heard a rush down one of the passages leading to the peristylium.

    A Friend of Caesar

    William Stearns Davis

  • Besides, he is there only while he is asleep; for the rest he has his atrium and his peristylium.

    Roman Women

    Alfred Brittain

  • The Agonothetai employed him to paint a wrestler or champion, to adorn the peristylium of the Gymnasia.