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Pharisaic

or Phar·i·sa·i·cal

[far-uh-sey-ik or far-uh-sey-i-kuh l]
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adjective
  1. of or relating to the Pharisees.
  2. (lowercase) practicing or advocating strict observance of external forms and ceremonies of religion or conduct without regard to the spirit; self-righteous; hypocritical.
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Origin of Pharisaic

1610–20; < Late Latin Pharisaicus < Greek Pharisaikós. See Pharisee, -ic
Related formsPhar·i·sa·i·cal·ly, adverbPhar·i·sa·i·cal·ess, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

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Examples from the Web for pharisaic

Historical Examples

  • Yet there was nothing Pharisaic about his speech or bearing.

    The Bishop's Secret

    Fergus Hume

  • The answer struck at the principle of the Pharisaic character.

    The Gospel of St. John

    Frederick Denison Maurice

  • Of course there could not be, in the nature of things, a Pharisaic Christology.

  • For the radicalism of the time was exclusively, we may say, pharisaic.

    The Cradle of the Christ

    Octavius Brooks Frothingham

  • The moral rules of the Pharisaic Rabbis should also be included.


British Dictionary definitions for pharisaic

Pharisaic

Pharisaical

adjective
  1. Judaism of, relating to, or characteristic of the Pharisees or Pharisaism
  2. (often not capital) righteously hypocritical
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Derived FormsPharisaically, adverbPharisaicalness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pharisaic

adj.

1610s, from Church Latin pharisaicus, from Greek pharisaikos, from pharisaios (see Pharisee). Related: Pharisaical (1530s).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper