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place

[ pleys ]
/ pleɪs /
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See synonyms for: place / placed / places / placing on Thesaurus.com

noun
verb (used with object), placed, plac·ing.
verb (used without object), placed, plac·ing.
Sports.
  1. to finish among the first three competitors in a race.
  2. to finish second in a horse race, harness race, etc.
to earn a specified standing with relation to others, as in an examination, competition, etc.: He placed fifth in a graduation class of 90.
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Idioms about place

Origin of place

First recordedbefore 950; Middle English noun plaas, plas, a conflation of Old English plæce, plætse and Middle French place, plasse “space, available space,” from Medieval Latin placea, from Vulgar Latin plattea, from Latin platea, platēa “wide street, courtyard, area,” from Greek plateîa (hodós) “wide (street),” noun use of feminine of platýs “wide, broad, level”; verb derivative of the noun; see flat1, plate1

synonym study for place

9. See position. 30. See put.

OTHER WORDS FROM place

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use place in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for place (1 of 2)

place
/ (pleɪs) /

noun
verb (mainly tr)

Word Origin for place

C13: via Old French from Latin platēa courtyard, from Greek plateia, from platus broad; compare French plat flat

British Dictionary definitions for place (2 of 2)

Place
/ (pleɪs) /

noun
Francis. 1771–1854, British radical, who campaigned for the repeal (1824) of the Combination Acts, which forbade the forming of trade unions, and for parliamentary reform
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with place

place

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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