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plinth

[ plinth ]
/ plɪnθ /
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noun Architecture.
a slablike member beneath the base of a column or pier.
a square base or a lower block, as of a pedestal.
Also called plinth course . a projecting course of stones at the base of a wall; earth table.
(in joinery) a flat member at the bottom of an architrave, dado, baseboard, or the like.
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Origin of plinth

1555–65; earlier plinthus<Latin <Greek plínthos plinth, squared stone, brick, tile

OTHER WORDS FROM plinth

plinthless, adjectiveplinthlike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use plinth in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for plinth

plinth
/ (plɪnθ) /

noun
Also called: socle the rectangular slab or block that forms the lowest part of the base of a column, statue, pedestal, or pier
Also called: plinth course the lowest part of the wall of a building that appears above ground level, esp one that is formed of a course of stone or brick
a flat block on either side of a doorframe, where the architrave meets the skirting
a flat base on which a structure or piece of equipment is placed

Word Origin for plinth

C17: from Latin plinthus, from Greek plinthos brick, shaped stone
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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