dinner

[din-er]

Origin of dinner

1250–1300; Middle English diner < Old French disner (noun use of v.); see dine
Related formsdin·ner·less, adjectivepre·din·ner, noun, adjective
Can be confuseddiner dinner
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for pre-dinner

Contemporary Examples of pre-dinner

Historical Examples of pre-dinner

  • A host of quiet members of the Anglo-Saxon colony had come in for their pre-dinner cock-tails.

  • The butler must have been busy with his pre-dinner tasks in the rear; it was Gladys herself who admitted him.

    Murder in the Gunroom

    Henry Beam Piper


British Dictionary definitions for pre-dinner

dinner

noun
  1. a meal taken in the evening
  2. a meal taken at midday, esp when it is the main meal of the day; lunch
    1. a formal evening meal, as of a club, society, etc
    2. a public banquet in honour of someone or something
  3. a complete meal at a fixed price in a restaurant; table d'hôte
  4. (modifier) of, relating to, or used at dinnerdinner plate; dinner table; dinner hour
  5. do like a dinner (usually passive) Australian informal to do for, overpower, or outdo

Word Origin for dinner

C13: from Old French disner; see dine
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pre-dinner

dinner

n.

c.1300, from Old French disner (11c.), originally "breakfast," later "lunch," noun use of infinitive disner (see dine). Always used in English for the main meal of the day; shift from midday to evening began with the fashionable classes. Childish reduplication din-din is attested from 1905.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper