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modern

[ mod-ern ]
/ ˈmɒd ərn /
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See synonyms for: modern / moderns on Thesaurus.com

adjective
noun
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Origin of modern

1490–1500; from Middle French moderne, from Late Latin modernus, equivalent to Latin mod(o), mod(ō), “lately, just now” (originally ablative singular of modusmode1) + -ernus adjective suffix of time

synonym study for modern

1. Modern, recent, late apply to that which is near to or characteristic of the present as contrasted with any other time. Modern is applied to those things that exist in the present age, especially in contrast to those of a former age or an age long past; hence the word sometimes has the connotation of up-to-date and, thus, good: modern ideas. That which is recent is separated from the present or the time of action by only a short interval; it is new, fresh, and novel: recent developments. Late may mean nearest to the present moment: the late reports on the battle.

OTHER WORDS FROM modern

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use modern in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for modern

modern
/ (ˈmɒdən) /

adjective
of, involving, or befitting the present or a recent time; contemporary
of, relating to, or characteristic of contemporary styles or schools of art, literature, music, etc, esp those of an experimental kind
belonging or relating to the period in history from the end of the Middle Ages to the present
noun
a contemporary person
printing a type style that originated around the beginning of the 19th century, characterized chiefly by marked contrast between thick and thin strokesCompare old face

Derived forms of modern

modernly, adverbmodernness, noun

Word Origin for modern

C16: from Old French, from Late Latin modernus, from modō (adv) just recently, from modus mode
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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