proposition

[ prop-uh-zish-uh n ]
/ ˌprɒp əˈzɪʃ ən /

noun

verb (used with object)

to propose sexual relations to.
to propose a plan, deal, etc., to.

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Origin of proposition

1300–50; Middle English proposicio(u)n < Latin prōpositiōn- (stem of prōpositiō) a setting forth. See propositus, -ion

OTHER WORDS FROM proposition

prop·o·si·tion·al, adjectiveprop·o·si·tion·al·ly, adverbun·der·prop·o·si·tion, noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH proposition

preposition proposition (see usage note at preposition1)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for proposition

British Dictionary definitions for proposition

proposition
/ (ˌprɒpəˈzɪʃən) /

noun

a proposal or topic presented for consideration
philosophy
  1. the content of a sentence that affirms or denies something and is capable of being true or false
  2. the meaning of such a sentence: I am warm always expresses the same proposition whoever the speaker isCompare statement (def. 8)
maths a statement or theorem, usually containing its proof
informal a person or matter to be dealt withhe's a difficult proposition
an invitation to engage in sexual intercourse

verb

(tr) to propose a plan, deal, etc, to, esp to engage in sexual intercourse

Derived forms of proposition

propositional, adjectivepropositionally, adverb

Word Origin for proposition

C14 proposicioun, from Latin prōpositiō a setting forth; see propose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012