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provoke

[ pruh-vohk ]
/ prəˈvoʊk /
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See synonyms for: provoke / provoked / provokes / provoking on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), pro·voked, pro·vok·ing.

to anger, enrage, exasperate, or vex.
to stir up, arouse, or call forth (feelings, desires, or activity): The mishap provoked a hearty laugh.
to incite or stimulate (a person, animal, etc.) to action.
to give rise to, induce, or bring about: What could have provoked such an incident?
Obsolete. to summon.

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Origin of provoke

1400–50; late Middle English <Latin prōvocāre to call forth, challenge, provoke, equivalent to prō-pro-1 + vocāre to call; akin to vōxvoice
1. See irritate. 2, 3. See incite.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for provoke

provoke
/ (prəˈvəʊk) /

verb (tr)

to anger or infuriate
to cause to act or behave in a certain manner; incite or stimulate
to promote (certain feelings, esp anger, indignation, etc) in a person
obsolete to summon
provoking, adjectiveprovokingly, adverb
C15: from Latin prōvocāre to call forth, from vocāre to call
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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