quality

[ kwol-i-tee ]
/ ˈkwɒl ɪ ti /

noun, plural qual·i·ties.

adjective

Origin of quality

1250–1300; Middle English qualite < Old French < Latin quālitās, equivalent to quāl(is) of what sort + -itās -ity

OTHER WORDS FROM quality

qual·i·ty·less, adjectivenon·qual·i·ty, noun, plural non·qual·i·ties.sub·qual·i·ty, noun, plural sub·qual·i·ties.

synonym study for quality

1. Quality, attribute, property agree in meaning a particular characteristic (of a person or thing). A quality is a characteristic, innate or acquired, that, in some particular, determines the nature and behavior of a person or thing: naturalness as a quality; the quality of meat. An attribute was originally a quality attributed, usually to a person or something personified; more recently it has meant a fundamental or innate characteristic: an attribute of God; attributes of a logical mind. Property applies only to things; it means a characteristic belonging specifically in the constitution of, or found (invariably) in, the behavior of a thing: physical properties of uranium or of limestone.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for quality

British Dictionary definitions for quality

quality
/ (ˈkwɒlɪtɪ) /

noun plural -ties

Word Origin for quality

C13: from Old French qualité, from Latin quālitās state, nature, from quālis of what sort
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012