quote

[ kwoht ]
/ kwoʊt /

verb (used with object), quot·ed, quot·ing.

verb (used without object), quot·ed, quot·ing.

to make a quotation or quotations, as from a book or author.
(used by a speaker to indicate the beginning of a quotation.)

noun

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WHO SAID IT: A QUIZ ON PRESIDENTIAL WIT AND WISDOM

Think you know your presidents? Take this quiz and see if you can match the style, wit, and ideology of these memorable lines to the right POTUS.
Question 1 of 9
“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”

Idioms for quote

    quote unquote, so called; so to speak; as it were: If you're a liberal, quote unquote, they're suspicious of you.

Origin of quote

1350–1400; 1880–85 for def. 9; Middle English coten, quoten (<Old French coter) <Medieval Latin quotāre to divide into chapters and verses, derivative of Latin quot how many

OTHER WORDS FROM quote

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH quote

quotation, quote
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for quote

British Dictionary definitions for quote

quote
/ (kwəʊt) /

verb

to recite a quotation (from a book, play, poem, etc), esp as a means of illustrating or supporting a statement
(tr) to put quotation marks round (a word, phrase, etc)
stock exchange to state (a current market price) of (a security or commodity)

noun

(often plural) an informal word for quotation mark put it in quotes

interjection

an expression used parenthetically to indicate that the words that follow it form a quotationthe president said, quote, I shall not run for office in November, unquote

Word Origin for quote

C14: from Medieval Latin quotāre to assign reference numbers to passages, from Latin quot how many
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012