rack

1
[ rak ]
/ ræk /

noun

verb (used with object)

Verb Phrases

rack out, Slang. to go to bed; go to sleep: I racked out all afternoon.
rack up,
  1. Pool. to put (the balls) in a rack.
  2. Informal. to tally, accumulate, or amass as an achievement or score: The corporation racked up the greatest profits in its history.

Origin of rack

1
1250–1300; Middle English rakke, rekke (noun) < Middle Dutch rac, rec, recke; compare Middle Low German reck, German Reck

Related forms

rack·ing·ly, adverb

Can be confused

rack wrack wreak wreckracked wracked wreaked wrecked

Definition for rack (2 of 6)

rack

2
[ rak ]
/ ræk /

noun

ruin or destruction; wrack.

Verb Phrases

rack up, Slang. to wreck, especially a vehicle.

Origin of rack

2
First recorded in 1590–1600; variant of wrack1

Definition for rack (3 of 6)

rack

3
[ rak ]
/ ræk /

noun

the fast pace of a horse in which the legs move in lateral pairs but not simultaneously.

verb (used without object)

(of horses) to move in a rack.

Origin of rack

3
First recorded in 1570–80; perhaps variant of rock2

Definition for rack (4 of 6)

rack

4

or wrack

[ rak ]
/ ræk /

noun

Also called cloud rack. a group of drifting clouds.

verb (used without object)

to drive or move, especially before the wind.

Origin of rack

4
1350–1400; Middle English rak, reck(e); origin uncertain

Definition for rack (5 of 6)

rack

5
[ rak ]
/ ræk /

verb (used with object)

to draw off (wine, cider, etc.) from the lees.

Origin of rack

5
1425–75; late Middle English < Old French; compare obsolete French raqué (of wine) pressed from the dregs of grapes

Definition for rack (6 of 6)

rack

6
[ rak ]
/ ræk /

noun

the neck portion of mutton, pork, or veal.
the rib section of a foresaddle of lamb, mutton, or sometimes veal.

Origin of rack

6
First recorded in 1560–70; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for rack

British Dictionary definitions for rack (1 of 6)

rack

1
/ (ræk) /

noun

verb (tr)

See also rack up

Derived Forms

racker, noun

Word Origin for rack

C14 rekke, probably from Middle Dutch rec framework; related to Old High German recchen to stretch, Old Norse rekja to spread out

xref

British Dictionary definitions for rack (2 of 6)

rack

2
/ (ræk) /

noun

destruction; wreck (obsolete except in the phrase go to rack and ruin)

Word Origin for rack

C16: variant of wrack 1

British Dictionary definitions for rack (3 of 6)

rack

3
/ (ræk) /

noun

another word for single-foot, a gait of the horse

Word Origin for rack

C16: perhaps based on rock ²

British Dictionary definitions for rack (4 of 6)

rack

4
/ (ræk) /

noun

a group of broken clouds moving in the wind

verb

(intr) (of clouds) to be blown along by the wind

Word Origin for rack

Old English wrǣc what is driven; related to Gothic wraks persecutor, Swedish vrak wreckage

British Dictionary definitions for rack (5 of 6)

rack

5
/ (ræk) /

verb (tr)

to clear (wine, beer, etc) as by siphoning it off from the dregs
to fill a container with (beer, wine, etc)

Word Origin for rack

C15: from Old Provençal arraca, from raca dregs of grapes after pressing

British Dictionary definitions for rack (6 of 6)

rack

6
/ (ræk) /

noun

the neck or rib section of mutton, pork, or veal

Word Origin for rack

Old English hrace; related to Old High German rahho, Danish harke, Swedish harkla to clear one's throat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with rack

rack


In addition to the idioms beginning with rack

  • rack and ruin, go to
  • rack one's brain
  • rack out
  • rack up

also see:

  • on the rack
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.