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Raynaud's disease

[ rey-nohz ]
/ reɪˈnoʊz /
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noun Pathology.
a vascular disorder of unknown cause, characterized by recurrent episodes of blanching and numbness of the fingers and toes and sometimes the tip of the nose and ears, usually triggered by stress or exposure to cold.
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Origin of Raynaud's disease

1880–85; named after Maurice Raynaud (1834–81), French physician who described it
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use Raynaud's disease in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for Raynaud's disease

Raynaud's disease
/ (ˈreɪnəʊz) /

noun
a disease, mainly affecting women, in which spasms in the blood vessels of the fingers or toes restrict blood flow to the affected part, which becomes pale, numb, and sometimes painfulOften shortened to: Raynaud's

Word Origin for Raynaud's disease

named after Maurice Raynaud (1834–81), French physician who first described it
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for Raynaud's disease

Raynaud's disease
[ rā-nōz, rĕ- ]

n.
A circulatory disorder that affects the hands and feet, caused by insufficient blood supply to these parts and resulting in cyanosis, numbness, pain, and, in extreme cases, gangrene.Raynaud's syndrome
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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