offend

[uh-fend]
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verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to cause resentful displeasure; irritate, annoy, or anger: a remark so thoughtless it can only offend.
to err in conduct; commit a sin, crime, or fault.

Origin of offend

1275–1325; Middle English offenden < Middle French offendre < Latin offendere to strike against, displease, equivalent to of- of- + -fendere to strike
Related formsof·fend·a·ble, adjectiveof·fend·ed·ly, adverbof·fend·ed·ness, nounof·fend·er, nounhalf-of·fend·ed, adjectivenon·of·fend·er, nouno·ver·of·fend, verb (used with object)pre·of·fend, verb (used with object)re·of·fend, verbun·of·fend·a·ble, adjectiveun·of·fend·ed, adjectiveun·of·fend·ing, adjective

Synonyms for offend

Antonyms for offend

1. please.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for re-offend

offend

verb

to hurt the feelings, sense of dignity, etc, of (a person)
(tr) to be disagreeable to; disgustthe smell offended him
(intr except in archaic uses) to break (a law or laws in general)
Derived Formsoffender, nounoffending, adjective

Word Origin for offend

C14: via Old French offendre to strike against, from Latin offendere, from ob- against + fendere to strike
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for re-offend

offend

v.

early 14c., "to sin against (someone)," from Old French ofendre "transgress, antagonize," and directly from Latin offendere "to hit, strike against," figuratively "to stumble, commit a fault, displease, trespass against, provoke," from ob "against" (see ob-) + -fendere "to strike" (found only in compounds; see defend).

Meaning "to violate (a law), to make a moral false step, to commit a crime" is from late 14c. Meaning "to wound the feelings" is from late 14c. The literal sense of "to attack, assail" is attested from late 14c.; this has been lost in Modern English, but is preserved in offense and offensive. Related: Offended; offending.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper