arrange

[ uh-reynj ]
/ əˈreɪndʒ /

verb (used with object), ar·ranged, ar·rang·ing.

to place in proper, desired, or convenient order; adjust properly: to arrange books on a shelf.
to come to an agreement or understanding regarding: The two sides arranged the sale of the property.
to prepare or plan: to arrange the details of a meeting.
Music. to adapt (a composition) for a particular style of performance by voices or instruments.

verb (used without object), ar·ranged, ar·rang·ing.

to make plans or preparations: They arranged for a conference on Wednesday.
to make a settlement; come to an agreement: to arrange with the coal company for regular deliveries.

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Origin of arrange

1325–75; Middle English arayngen < Middle French arangier, equivalent to a- a-5 + rangier to range

OTHER WORDS FROM arrange

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for rearrange

British Dictionary definitions for rearrange (1 of 2)

rearrange
/ (ˌriːəˈreɪndʒ) /

verb (tr)

to put (something) into a new orderto rearrange the lighting
to put (something) back in its original order after it has been displaced
to fix a new date or time for (something postponed)to rearrange a match

Derived forms of rearrange

rearranger, nounrearrangement, noun

British Dictionary definitions for rearrange (2 of 2)

arrange
/ (əˈreɪndʒ) /

verb

(tr) to put into a proper, systematic, or decorative order
(tr; may take a clause as object or an infinitive) to arrive at an agreement or understanding about; settle
(when intr, often foll by for; when tr, may take a clause as object or an infinitive ) to make plans or preparations in advance (for something)we arranged for her to be met
(tr) to adapt (a musical composition) for performance in a different way, esp on different instruments
(tr) to adapt (a play, etc) for broadcasting
(intr often foll by with) to come to an agreement

Derived forms of arrange

arrangeable, adjectivearranger, noun

Word Origin for arrange

C14: from Old French arangier, from a- ² + rangier to put in a row, range
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012