reformist

[ri-fawr-mist]
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noun

a person who advocates or practices reform; reformer.
a member of any reformed denomination.

adjective

Also re·form·is·tic. of or belonging to a movement for reform.

Origin of reformist

First recorded in 1580–90; reform + -ist
Related formsre·form·ism, nounan·ti·re·form·ist, noun, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for reformism

Historical Examples of reformism

  • The passage of Bebel's resolution, by a vote of 289 to 80, was an emphatic repudiation of reformism.

    Socialism As It Is

    William English Walling

  • There can be no doubt that Socialist "reformism" has become very widespread.

    Socialism As It Is

    William English Walling

  • But reformism has brought it about that the Party is often split in its votes in the Chamber of Deputies.

    Socialism As It Is

    William English Walling

  • Mr. Berger's maiden speech also summed up excellently the general policy of Socialist "reformism."

    Socialism As It Is

    William English Walling

  • On the other hand, political action was a blind-alley leading to reformism and quietism.



British Dictionary definitions for reformism

reformism

noun

a doctrine or movement advocating reform, esp political or religious reform, rather than abolition
Derived Formsreformist, noun, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for reformism

reformist

n.

1580s, originally religious; from reform + -ist. Political sense is from 1640s. Related: Reformism.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper