repressor

[ ri-pres-er ]
/ rɪˈprɛs ər /

noun

Genetics. a protein that binds DNA at an operator site and thereby prevents transcription of one or more adjacent genes.

QUIZZES

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUNCTUATION QUIZ

Punctuation marks help make writing easy to read and understand. Some of the most important ones are the period (.), comma (,), question mark (?), and exclamation point (!). How well do you know how to use them? Find out in this quiz!
Question 1 of 10
Which punctuation mark is best for this sentence? "Can I watch a movie __"

Origin of repressor

From Latin, dating back to 1955–60; see origin at repress, -tor

Definition for repressor (2 of 2)

represser

or re·pres·sor

[ ri-pres-er ]
/ rɪˈprɛs ər /

noun

a person or thing that represses.

Origin of represser

late Middle English word dating back to 1400–50; see origin at repress, -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for repressor

British Dictionary definitions for repressor

repressor
/ (rɪˈprɛsə) /

noun

biochem a protein synthesized under the control of a repressor gene, which has the capacity to bind to the operator gene and thereby shut off the expression of the structural genes of an operon
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for repressor

repressor
[ rĭ-prĕsər ]

n.

One that represses.
A protein, especially either of two proteins produced by regulatory genes, that blocks transcription of an operon.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for repressor

repressor
[ rĭ-prĕsər ]

A protein that binds to an operator, blocking transcription of an operon and the enzymes for which the operon codes.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.