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reverend

[ rev-er-uhnd, rev-ruhnd ]
/ ˈrɛv ər ənd, ˈrɛv rənd /
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adjective
(initial capital letter) (used as a title of respect applied or prefixed to the name of a member of the clergy or a religious order): Reverend Timothy Cranshaw; Reverend Mother.
worthy to be revered; entitled to reverence.
pertaining to or characteristic of the clergy.
noun
Informal. a member of the clergy.
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Origin of reverend

1400–50; late Middle English <Latin reverendus worthy of being revered, gerund of reverērī to revere1

OTHER WORDS FROM reverend

rev·er·end·ship, noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH reverend

reverend , reverent
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use reverend in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for reverend (1 of 2)

reverend
/ (ˈrɛvərənd) /

adjective
worthy of reverence
relating to or designating a clergyman or the clergy
noun
informal a clergyman

Word Origin for reverend

C15: from Latin reverendus fit to be revered; see revere

British Dictionary definitions for reverend (2 of 2)

Reverend
/ (ˈrɛvərənd) /

adjective
a title of respect for a clergymanAbbreviations: Rev., Revd See also Very Reverend, Right Reverend, Most Reverend

usage for Reverend

Reverend with a surname alone (Reverend Smith), as a term of address (``Yes, Reverend''), or in the salutation of a letter (Dear Rev. Mr Smith) are all generally considered to be wrong usage. Preferred are (the) Reverend John Smith or Reverend Mr Smith and Dear Mr Smith
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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