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rollout

or roll-out

[ rohl-out ]
/ ˈroʊlˌaʊt /
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noun
the first public showing of an aircraft.
Informal. the introduction or inauguration of a new product or service, as by an advertising campaign, public announcement, or exhibition: the most lavish rollout in soft-drink history.
Football. an offensive maneuver in which the quarterback, having the option to run or pass, takes the ball from the center, moves back a distance toward his goal line, and then moves forward and toward a sideline.
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Origin of rollout

First recorded in 1955–60; noun use of verb phrase roll out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use rollout in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for rollout

roll out

verb (tr, adverb)
to cause (pastry) to become flatter and thinner by pressure with a rolling pin
to show (a new type of aircraft) to the public for the first time
to launch (a new film, product, etc) in a series of stages over an area, each stage involving an increased number of outlets
noun roll-out
a presentation to the public of a new aircraft, product, etc; a launch
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with rollout

roll out

1

Get out of bed, as in I rolled out around six o'clock this morning. [Colloquial; late 1800s]

2

Introduce, disclose, as in They rolled out the new washing machine with great fanfare.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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