sage

1
[ seyj ]
/ seɪdʒ /
||

noun

a profoundly wise person; a person famed for wisdom.
someone venerated for the possession of wisdom, judgment, and experience.

adjective, sag·er, sag·est.

wise, judicious, or prudent: sage advice.

Origin of sage

1
1250–1300; Middle English (noun and adj.) < Old French < Late Latin sapidus wise, tasteful (Latin: tasty), equivalent to sap(ere) to know, be wise, orig. to taste (see sapient) + -idus -id4
SYNONYMS FOR sage
ANTONYMS FOR sage
1 fool.
Related formssage·ly, adverbsage·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

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British Dictionary definitions for sager (1 of 2)

sage

1
/ (seɪdʒ) /

noun

a man revered for his profound wisdom

adjective

profoundly wise or prudent
obsolete solemn
Derived Formssagely, adverbsageness, noun

Word Origin for sage

C13: from Old French, from Latin sapere to be sensible; see sapient

British Dictionary definitions for sager (2 of 2)

sage

2
/ (seɪdʒ) /

noun

a perennial Mediterranean plant, Salvia officinalis, having grey-green leaves and purple, blue, or white flowers: family Lamiaceae (labiates)
the leaves of this plant, used in cooking for flavouring
short for sagebrush

Word Origin for sage

C14: from Old French saulge, from Latin salvia, from salvus safe, in good health (from the curative properties attributed to the plant)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012