salamander

[ sal-uh-man-der ]
/ ˈsæl əˌmæn dər /

noun

any tailed amphibian of the order Caudata, having a soft, moist, scaleless skin, typically aquatic as a larva and semiterrestrial as an adult: several species are endangered.
a mythical being, especially a lizard or other reptile, thought to be able to live in fire.
any of various portable stoves or burners.
Metallurgy. a mass of iron that accumulates at the bottom of a blast furnace as a result of the escape of molten metal through the hearth.
a metal plate or disk with a handle, heated and held over pastry, casserole crusts, etc., to brown or glaze it.
an oven usually heated from the top and bottom by gas, for cooking, browning, and glazing food.

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Origin of salamander

1300–50; Middle English salamandre < Latin salamandra < Greek salamándrā

OTHER WORDS FROM salamander

sal·a·man·der·like, adjectivesal·a·man·drine [sal-uh-man-drin] /ˌsæl əˈmæn drɪn/, adjectivesal·a·man·droid, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

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British Dictionary definitions for salamander

salamander
/ (ˈsæləˌmændə) /

noun

Derived forms of salamander

salamandrine (ˌsæləˈmændrɪn), adjective

Word Origin for salamander

C14: from Old French salamandre, from Latin salamandra, from Greek
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012